Persistent Leatherback Turtle Migrations Present Opportunities for Conservation

TitlePersistent Leatherback Turtle Migrations Present Opportunities for Conservation
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2008
Refereed DesignationRefereed
AuthorsShillinger, G. L., Palacios D. M., Bailey H., Bograd S. J., Swithenbank A. M., Gaspar P., Wallace B. P., Spotila J. R., Paladino F. V., Piedra R., Eckert S. A., & Block B. A.
JournalPLoS Biology
Volume6
Paginatione171
Date Published2008
ISSN1545-7885
Abstract

Effective transboundary conservation of highly migratory marine animals requires international management cooperation as well as clear scientific information about habitat use by these species. Populations of leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea) in the eastern Pacific have declined by >90% during the past two decades, primarily due to unsustainable egg harvest and fisheries bycatch mortality. While research and conservation efforts on nesting beaches are ongoing, relatively little is known about this population of leatherbacks' oceanic habitat use and migration pathways. We present the largest multi-year (2004–2005, 2005–2006, and 2007) satellite tracking dataset (12,095 cumulative satellite tracking days) collected for leatherback turtles. Forty-six females were electronically tagged during three field seasons at Playa Grande, Costa Rica, the largest extant nesting colony in the eastern Pacific. After completing nesting, the turtles headed southward, traversing the dynamic equatorial currents with rapid, directed movements. In contrast to the highly varied dispersal patterns seen in many other sea turtle populations, leatherbacks from Playa Grande traveled within a persistent migration corridor from Costa Rica, past the equator, and into the South Pacific Gyre, a vast, low-energy, low-productivity region. We describe the predictable effects of ocean currents on a leatherback migration corridor and characterize long-distance movements by the turtles in the eastern South Pacific. These data from high seas habitats will also elucidate potential areas for mitigating fisheries bycatch interactions. These findings directly inform existing multinational conservation frameworks and provide immediate regions in the migration corridor where conservation can be implemented. We identify high seas locations for focusing future conservation efforts within the leatherback dispersal zone in the South Pacific Gyre

URLhttp://www.plosbiology.org/article/info:doi/10.1371/journal.pbio.0060171
DOI10.1371/journal.pbio.0060171.sg001
Short TitlePlos Biol