Genetic variability and spatial separation in the sea palm Postelsia palmaeformis (Phaeophyceae) as assessed with M13 fingerprints and RAPDS

TitleGenetic variability and spatial separation in the sea palm Postelsia palmaeformis (Phaeophyceae) as assessed with M13 fingerprints and RAPDS
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication1997
AuthorsCoyer, J. A., Olsen J. L., & Stam W. T.
Refereed DesignationRefereed
JournalJournal of Phycology
Volume33
Issue4
Pagination561-568
Abstract

Postelsia palmaeformis Ruprecht is an annual species, occuring from southern California to Vancouver Island, Canada, in upper intertidal sites exposed to extreme wave shock. Because of its limited spore dispersal, discrete and inbred populations are likely on the local scale, yet dispersal of drifting and fertile thalli raises the possibility of outbred populations on a regional scale. M13 minisatellite DNA fingerprinting and random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers were used in a complementary fashion to investigate genetic variability among 24 individuals on scales of clusters (= coalesced holdfasts). <1 m, 10 m, 25 m, 16 km, and 250 km. Based on M13 fingerprinting, genetic relatedness within clusters was extremely high. Three of six clusters had at least two identical individuals, and similarity values within five clusters were > = 0.90. Similarities between two of three clusters separated by <1 m were significantly higher than between cluster pairs separated by 25 m and 250 km: however, the similarity between two clusters separated by 25 m was equivalent to the similarity between two clusters separated by 250 km. Thus, genetic relatedness as determined by M13 fingerprinting generally decreased as distance increased to 25 m. Conversely, RAPD data easily discriminated populations separated by 16 and 250 km but were not useful in discriminating individuals from <1 to 25 m. Results from the complementary data sets suggest that most dispersal occurs over distances of 1-5 m, individuals within a cluster are siblings, and distinguishable biogeographic populations are present along the coast.